The Untold Truth Of Bridezillas

The Untold Truth Of Bridezillas


One of the reasons the month of June is such
a go-to for weddings is that in Ancient Rome, it was the save the date option of choice
to honor the goddess Juno, who protected women in marriage and childbearing — but who was
also often portrayed as a savage and warlike goddess who eventually gave birth to to the
god of war. Perhaps that regal figure was also the inspiration
for the June, 2004 debut date of Bridezillas, which was designed to follow a bride through
the final days of her wedding preparations and highlight the stressed-out bride’s outlandish
and sometimes violent behavior. The show’s title is fairly telling of the
temperament of its stars, but here are a few things you might not have known about the
show and its cast. Just add crazy Some Bridezillas send in their own applications
to be on the show, but for others, it’s a relative — or even the groom-to-be — who
signs the bossy bride up to appear. According to some who’ve been in the latter
category, producers who interviewed them tended to choose the most, um, entertaining candidates
of the application batch. In other words, they were looking for brides
with just a touch of crazy to be in the mix for their aisle-ready stars because, well,
it’s just more fun to watch that way. “You look really skinny in that dress.” “Thanks” “That was not a compliment, that was a problem.” “Why is that a problem?” “Because you’re not supposed to look better
than me!” Blind-sided brides With a name like Bridezillas, the show’s directive
should have been clear. But not all brides saw it that way. Season two bride Julia Swinton-Williamson
unsuccessfully sued the producers for misleading her about the nature of the show. The lawsuit was thrown out in 2009, but she
wasn’t the only bride who felt duped. Porsha from season one has befriended many
of the former ‘Zillas who are furious about their portrayal on the show. Porsha said she knew the show was going to
make her look crazy because, as part of her contract, she was required to watch all previous
episodes of the show. But she said she didn’t care, because Bridezillas
are meant to be controlling and demanding. “Somebody better ask him where the Bachelor
Party gonna be at because I’m telling you, I’m gonna crash it.” Well, at least she knew what she was getting
herself into. Cashing in Many viewers might wonder why a woman would
sign up for a show that would capitalize on her pre-wedding psychosis, but it’s not just
the 15 minutes of infamy that comes along with being on the show. There’s also cold hard cash involved. “She’s got all the money, so she’s gotta keep
her pocket book open today.” No, the show doesn’t foot the wedding bill,
but participants do get paid for their time and certain expenses associated with filming,
which might help take the financial sting out of what is obviously a pricey life event. “How are we gonna pay for our aisle runner? How are we gonna pay for any of our decorations
that we still don’t have.” TV take two Every once in awhile, the Bridezillas are
popular enough to get another shot at small screen fame. For example, Natalie Nunn made a second television
splash in Oxygen’s Bad Girls Club, while other contestants have been given a chance to appear
on shows like The Biggest Loser and even The Bachelor. Suffice it to say that for some Zillas, the
credits roll on this show might not always mark the end of their screen time. Pickups Even though Bridezillas is technically unscripted,
some of the brides involved have reported being asked to do re-shoots of their various
encounters to add a little more drama — and foul language — to their already stressful
moments. “I don’t care if she had to have f***ing heart
surgery.” Of course, who could blame the producers for
wanting these kinds of moments to be perfectly horrific? Spinning off After 10 successful seasons of Bridezillas,
WE TV put together a spin-off series called Marriage Boot Camp, which aimed to save the
marriages of former Bridezillas couples gone bad. Some Bridezillas who appeared on the show
were disappointed at the ulterior motives of the show, though, claiming that producers
purposefully put the couples into difficult situations, like the episode where they tried,
unsuccessfully, to coax one woman into a casket, just to amp up the drama. “Oh hell no.” Yuck. Jailzilla Not all Zilla’s bad behavior went unpunished. Bride Karee Gibson Hart was jailed for two
days for violating her probation when she violently threatened her mother-in-law and
set her bridesmaid’s shoes on fire. This just goes to show that even actions on
a show that encourages bad behavior have consequences. Zillas ever after Despite their diva dispositions, not all the
Zillas have been doomed for divorce. According to former participant Porsha, in
fact, most of the couples who appeared alongside herself on Boot Camp survived their stresses. However, there have been some couples, like
Amanda and Steven from season 10, whose union may have been based on a wobbly foundation
long before they appeared on the show, and whose marital bliss crumbled soon after the
cameras stopped rolling. “I think she needs some, like, personal help.” Hey, it could be worse. Thanks for watching! Click the The List icon to subscribe to our
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