PCOS Symptoms and Diagnosis (2018) | PCOS 101 – Part 1 [CC]

PCOS Symptoms and Diagnosis (2018) | PCOS 101 – Part 1 [CC]


Hi everyone and welcome back to IRL JAKS where
I share with you my real life as it happens. And today, I’m going to give you a quick lesson
on PCOS. This is part one of five of everything you
need to know to get started with dealing with and understanding your PCOS. Today’s episode is going to be about symptoms
and diagnosis. We’ll talk about what diet you should be on
your treatment and getting pregnant with PCOS in later videos. Go ahead and be on the lookout for those. First things first, it’s important to remember
that PCOS, for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, is the most common reproductive and hormonal
disorder of women in childbearing years. One in 10 women is suspected to have polycystic
ovarian syndrome. So, you’re definitely not alone and this isn’t
some {inaudible 00:50}; which is why I wanted to make this video because it seems like the
information about it is kind of scattered and I wanted to kind of bring it all together
and bring my research together in one place. First of all, polycystic ovarian syndrome
is defined as having numerous cysts, usually 12 to 20 cysts on your ovaries at one time. Not only is that a number of cysts that define
this disorder, but it’s also the manner in which they present themselves. They usually present themselves in a string
of pearls-like fashion in women with PCOS. So, that means you’re having numerous cysts
that are all roughly the same size and they outline the edges of your ovary. Normal ovaries will have multiple cysts or
follicles, but they’ll be in different sizes and not all uniform like you see it in polycystic
ovarian syndrome. That’s the telltale marker of polycystic ovarian
syndrome, but there’s lots of symptoms that also get added into the mix when you’re trying
to get a diagnosis. One of the most common is heavy and irregular
cycles. You’re not bleeding every month, you’re not
bleeding for seven days, you’re bleeding for longer or shorter and there’s no rhyme or
reason to when you get your period. Other unpleasant symptoms of PCOS are hot
flashes, unwanted hair growth on your back stomach and face, as well as possible insulin
resistance. Now, insulin resistance isn’t diabetes, but
they’re closely related, because they both deal with insulin. Insulin resistance is when your cells don’t
respond properly to your insulin that’s carrying energy to them. So, if you want to think about it; your cell
has a door and you want to get energy or glucose through the door. You need insulin; which is the key to get
through the door. When you have insulin resistance, your key
doesn’t fit the lock anymore and your cells reject the energy. Diabetes is when you just don’t have enough
keys. With insulin resistance comes a few more symptoms
including fatigue and weight lain and inability to lose weight. Obviously, if your blood sugar or your insulin
is not working properly, it’s very hard to maintain a steady energy levels and it’s also
very hard to lose weight appropriately. The old adage of calories in equals calories
out doesn’t really make sense when your calories can’t get to the cells that they’re supposed
to be supplying. So, we’ll take a look at deeper into your
diet and exercise plan with PCOS and another video, but just be aware that if you’re struggling
to lose weight, even though you’re counting your calories and doing your cardio, it might
be a signal that something’s off with your insulin. Now, even though insulin resistance and diabetes
aren’t the same thing, it’s important to know that insulin resistance does up your chance
of developing type 2 diabetes when unmanaged. Eventually, if your body keeps producing insulin,
your keys and your doors or cells keep rejecting them, then your pancreas, which creates your
insulin is going to just stop working; which then lead to diabetes, you don’t have enough
keys and your keys don’t fit the lock, it becomes a really big problem when you’re trying
to fuel your cells. This inability for your insulin, glucose and
cells to interact properly together leads to 50% of women with PCOS being overweight. So, it’s obviously not a for sure thing, but
it is worth noting the fat is one of the common traits the doctors are looking for when they’re
trying to diagnose PCOS. PCOS can also manifest in your skin with acne,
oily skin or dark spots. There are also emotional side effects of PCOS
with depression, binge eating and mood swings just being added to the wonderful list of
things that can be caused by your insulin and cells not interacting properly. It also has a hormonal component added on
top of this. Anovulation or the inability of ovulate is
another symptom of PCOS. In fact, in anovulatory infertility cases,
90% of the time, PCOS is the culprit. If you want to learn more about getting pregnant
with PCOS, you can check out a video later in this series or if you want to hear my personal
story, you can check out this one year summary that I posted earlier. One final note on the symptoms is that this
is not related to endometriosis, which is another cause of infertility and period problems. There’s no connection, although you can have
both diseases, but it’s completely coincidental. What isn’t coincidental is that people of
PCOS seem to have a lot of instances of IBS or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The leading theory is that something to do
with the hormonal imbalance irritates your stomach and disrupts that process, but no
one really knows why this connection has occurred. It’s also worth noting there is the long-term
effect of an increased risk of endometrial cancer with PCOS. Any condition that causes you to not cycle
ups your chance of endometrial cancer, because your endometrial cells are not meant to stay
in the body for as long as they do when you’re not cycling. This is a small increase in this chance, but
it’s worth noting the left untreated, PCOS does have some minor long-term effects. A much larger long-term effect is your increased
chance of heart disease and diabetes. So, it is really worth talking to your doctor
if you’re concerned about it. So, when you do go talk to your doctor, there
are three things they’re going to be looking for to diagnose you with PCOS. You need to test positive for two of these
conditions to be diagnosed with PCOS. The first thing they’re going to look for
is a lack of ovulation over a long period of time. A consistent lack of cycle or lack of ovulation
is an indicator of PCOS. It’s worth noting that you can cycle without
ovulating and there are certain tests that can be done via ultrasound and blood work
to test to see if you’re ovulating. The second thing they’re going to be looking
for is a high level of androgens. This is a type of hormone that can be easily
tested with blood tests. The last thing they’re going to be looking
for is what the disease is named after and that polycystic ovaries. So, many cysts on your ovaries, usually 10
to 20 cysts per ovary, usually presenting in that string of pearls fashion right around
the edge of your ovary. This is done with the transvaginal ultrasound
and is a really quick and easy way to check for that telltale sign that you have polycystic
ovarian syndrome. Again, your doctor is going to need you test
positive for at least two of these symptoms to give you a PCOS diagnosis. They’re probably going to want to do some
other tests too to rule out some more serious diseases. They’re also probably going to take a look
at your blood sugars to see if you have insulin resistance. If your blood sugar levels come back consistently
high, your doctor may prescribe Metformin to help treat this. So, this was just a quick summary of the different
symptoms and how to get a diagnosis for polycystic ovarian syndrome. Like I said, I’m going to dive deeper into
polycystic ovarian syndrome and what you should do about it in different cases in a few upcoming
videos. Please subscribe to my channel and like this
video if you found it helpful and make sure to check out some of the other videos on my
channel. Until next time, keep on finding guys.

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