MY INTENSE BIRTH STORY! – Mukbang w/ Trisha Paytas

MY INTENSE BIRTH STORY! – Mukbang w/ Trisha Paytas


– Hi, guys! Trisha’s here! – Yeah, so excited. – I’m so excited, so, we’re
gonna do another mukbang. So I wanted to do a
mukbang ’cause I’m tired. I just had a baby and I was like, I need something I can just upload, but I really wanted to talk
about my whole birth experience, ’cause I posted my birth video, but I don’t really talk about, like, what I went through, what drugs I took, like, how long it took,
the baby’s measurements, all that sort of stuff, so I want to tell everything, but I can’t do mukbang without Trisha, she’s the queen.
– I’m so excited, I’m so honored, I’m so excited to hear about it ’cause I am obsessed with babies and birth and pregnancy. – No question is off-limits.
– Oh my god, I have so many. – So we’re gonna get all this out. – I like that we’re eating while we’re talking about your birth. – I know, oh yeah.
– My favorite. – I don’t even know what
I got, it’s tons of stuff. If you don’t like
pregnancy, birthing stories, you are gonna hate this
and you should turn it off, especially if we’re gonna be eating while we’re talking about everything. Okay, oh yeah, orange chicken, so good. Alright, so let’s start
from the beginning, and you can ask me
anything, like anything. So it started with, I
was 36 weeks pregnant, which is basically like, I had a month more of pregnancy to go, like three-ish weeks to
go, and I was in bed, and I had to pee in the
middle of the night, and I got up to pee, and I went and sat on the toilet
and felt like, a gush of something that was not pee. – Oh my God.
– And I looked in the toilet, and there was like,
nothing in there, really. I was like, did my water break? ‘Cause I didn’t know, and I looked it up, and it was like, your water
probably didn’t break, a lot of women think their water broke when really they just peed, so go back to bed and lay down, and then when you wake
up in thirty minutes, it was like, take thirty minutes and then go back to the bathroom and if there’s a little bit
of water in your underwear then maybe your water broke. So I was like, okay, so I got back in bed and adjusted my body, and when I did that, it was just like, woosh,
like so much fluid came, it was like in the movies.
– Really? – Like how water breaks in the movies, like it was like gush,
it made a gushing sound, it was like psh! Like, it was so gross.
– Really? Oh, I’ve never heard that before. Oh my God, it’s so crazy. – And I was like, oh
my God, my water broke. So I woke up Eric and
we weren’t ready at all, we didn’t have a hospital bag packed, we totally weren’t ready, and then. – You didn’t?
– No. – Oh, ’cause you thought
it was gonna be a month. Oh my God, that’s so crazy. I’ve never heard of a month
early, that’s so crazy. – Yeah, well, he’s big, too, the baby. So I’ll skip all the panicked
going to the hospital part. – I think that’s so interesting, though. Like, the hospital part
I think is the fun part. I think that’s like, oh
my God, it’s happening. – Okay, I’m gonna say this. You hear, your whole pregnancy, that birth is gonna be
the worst thing ever. Like, the whole time you hear like, birth is so hard, it’s so
horrible, it’s so scary, and I was scared, I had, like, an anxiety attack one day about it. We had a birthing lady come
and teach us how to do birth, and she left and I just
sobbed and like freaked out, ’cause it was just so
scary to me, and everyone, (baby wailing) My little bunny! Everyone told me how
horrible it was gonna be, and so now that I’ve done it, I’m like, it wasn’t that bad. – Really? That’s so interesting, ’cause throughout your whole pregnancy, you’re like, I hate being pregnant, like, don’t let that scare you, but I hate it so much. – I hated being pregnant, I do not recommend.
– Yeah, considering. – I hated being pregnant, so I thought birth was gonna be worse than pregnancy, and for me, it wasn’t. For me, pregnancy was
worse than the birth. – Really?
– Mhmm, so, but every woman is different, every body’s different. I have friends who were pregnant and didn’t feel any symptoms, they were like, “Oh, I
love being pregnant.” That was not my situation. – And you’re really small, like, I thought when you would give birth, ’cause your hips were so small and everything was so small on you, I thought, oh my God,
that’s gonna be so painful for you to get a baby outta there. – I mean, it was, it’s
not like it didn’t hurt, but it just wasn’t as bad as
everyone said it was gonna be. – They say it’s the worst type
of pain in the whole world. – Like, it is.
– Is it? It’s the worst pain you’ve felt? – Hmm, no, the worst pain, well. The contractions are really painful, but here’s the thing: I had something called pelvic girdle pain
in my second trimester, like, my four or five months, my pelvic bone literally
like, was ripping apart and was grinding against itself, and I had to be in a wheelchair, I could barely walk, I
was sobbing every day, it was so painful and my
pelvic bone just was destroyed, and that pain was worse
than childbirth for me. Because childbirth pain, like, the contractions go away, so like, you know, okay, here comes a contraction, have five deep breaths and then it’s over. So even though the pain is
really, really horrible, you know it’s gonna end, whereas my pelvic girdle pain or my fainting or my
barfing or my heartburn or any of the pains during
pregnancy didn’t end, it was just forever, so. – Oh my God, and did you go to the bathroom when you had the baby? – No, I wish. I wanted to poop so bad, but I didn’t. – I’ve heard that’s like, a thing. That would be my biggest fear. Even when I go to the bathroom myself, I always feel like, if that’s what it feels like to have a baby, I’m like, I bet this is what
it feels like to have a baby. – I wanted to, I wanted to so bad. Okay, so, here’s the deal, so I got to the hospital,
and they checked me, like, yes, your waters broke, and they said I was two
centimeters dilated, so you have to be at ten, your vagina, your cervix or whatever
has to be ten centimeters in order to push out the baby. – What do you mean? Like, a hole, like it opens up? – Yeah, like your cervix has
to open up to ten centimeters. Okay, so, or something,
I don’t know the science. I just know you have
to be ten centimeters, something has to be ten centimeters. – Somewhere!
– So I was two centimeters when I got there, and my water had broke, and they were like, okay, great. I was having contractions, and they’re, they are very painful,
contractions are very painful. For me they’re painful in my hips. Some people feel it in their back, in their stomachs, so
I felt it in my stomach but my hips were crazy pain. So I look back on my birth and I’m like, it wasn’t that bad, but Eric
and Rachel were in the room, my sister and Eric were in the room, and they said it was
like I would disappear when I was going through the contractions ’cause the pain was so bad, so they said, they’d be like, “Colleen”, I wouldn’t be able to talk. I’d close my eyes and
I would moan and groan, it was like I was possessed. – D’you not remember it? Were you like, blacked out, kind of? – I remember it, I remember it and I remember it being painful, I just remember, like, I had to focus on getting through the pain, so I couldn’t talk to anybody, I couldn’t look at anything,
I couldn’t hear anything, ’cause the pain was so bad that I had to just focus on getting through it. So that’s why, you
know, but I remember it. So then they came in and
they offered me a drug, but it wasn’t an epidural, they offered me a narcotic that they were gonna
give, like, inject into me to help take the edge off of the pain, and I was like, okay, I’ll take it. So no judgment to anyone
who does it any way, like, no drugs, drugs,
C-section, natural birth. I am like, if you get a baby out of you, you are awesome, like,
I don’t judge people. There’s a lot of judgment around this, like, this video, I’m sure
I’ll get a million comments about how I’m a horrible
mom ’cause I used drugs. – I could never, I could never, that’s like my number one thing. I would turn off comments if I were you. People just like, even
early on in your pregnancy, being like, we get it, you’re pregnant. – They told me to stop
showing that I was pregnant. I was like, I literally can’t. – Meanwhile, every video you post about pregnancy gets like, way more views. That’s why I’m really so confused, I mean, obviously people wanna see it if you’re getting way more views on your pregnancy videos
than anything else. – Right, it was really confusing, but anyway.
– People are awful. – God, I love spaghetti. – Oh, is that what you ate? ‘Cause that looks good. Is it just regular? – Yeah, it’s just spaghetti meatballs. – This is good too. – So then they came in,
they checked me again after like, an hour, and they said I was still only two centimeters, but when your water breaks, you have to get the baby out, because the water that comes out, the amniotic fluid, is
what the baby breathes. So the baby breathes fluid, essentially, inside of you, and so if you wait too long to get the baby out, the baby could get hurt, you know. It could, I don’t know all the details, but I am assuming the baby could suffocate because that’s what it breathes, you know, so if it doesn’t have its water to swim around in and
breathe, it can get hurt. So you have to get the baby out
in a certain amount of time. So I hadn’t progressed at all, in like an hour, I was
still two centimeters, so they were like, let’s give her pitocin, which is a drug that forces
your body to have contractions, so it forces your body to start trying to get the baby out, and I’ve always heard that
pitocin is really painful, like it causes really
painful contractions, but they had just given me
the narcotic drug, the shot, and so I was kinda high,
and they were like, “Do you want an epidural now?” And I said no, you just gave me the narcotic a couple
hours ago, so I’m good. And they’re like, “Are you sure
you don’t want an epidural? Because the pitocin
makes this very painful.” And I was like, yeah, I’m
good, like, I can do it. – Oh my God.
– So they gave me the pitocin and the contractions started coming fast, like every minute or two, and it was so, that I
remember being painful. That was so painful.
– The contractions? – The contractions were extremely painful, like, Eric, weren’t they bad? – [Eric] So bad. – So bad, they were bad.
– Were they like period cramps or were they like–
– No, it’s, yes, I guess. Like period cramps times a billion, and like really horrible hip pain, pelvic pain, vagina pain, like, I can’t really explain it, it was just excruciating pain, like, to the point
where I couldn’t control what was coming out of my mouth, I was like, ugh, I was
making crazy sounds. And so, after like, fifteen,
twenty minutes of that, the nurse could hear me and she came in, she was like, “Someone’s
ready for an epidural!” – Did she say it like that? – Yeah, and I was like,
“Yes, I am, please.” So an epidural is like a
drug they put in your spine. So like, they give you a good shot, like a tube, like an injection, what do you call it, like an IV, essentially, in your spine. – And it stays in there?
– It stays in there. So you have all these IVs in your hand, and then they put one in your spine, and you can’t, you have to
lay down for the rest of it, ’cause you can’t get up
’cause your legs are numb, it numbs basically everything. So I laid down, and everyone says the epidural’s really painful to get. It’s not, it’s just like, scary, because they’re shoving
something in your spine, so it’s like.
– Like it could paralyze you? – Yeah. What? – [Eric] You can’t move. – Yeah, you can’t move.
– You have to stay still. Is it in you while you’re giving birth? – Yes.
– Oh, so it is an IV. – Yeah, it’s an IV.
– Like, a giant needle? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. See, so it’s scary, and that’s the worst part about the epidural, is like, the thought of it, it’s like, oh God, that’s horrible. But I was having a contraction while they were putting it in me, and they were like, you can’t move, don’t move, don’t move, and I was like, (Colleen moans) ’cause I having a contraction, so I was in pain and I
couldn’t move, it was horrible. But they put the epidural in, and it was life changing. Like I don’t understand, like, I think it’s so cool and admirable when women are like, “I’m
doing it with no drugs,” like that’s so, so cool, and I’m so like, I admire you, that’s amazing. I could not do it, the pain was so bad, the epidural made it so that, like, I could relax, I took a nap. I was having contractions
and I took a nap. – Wow, really?
– Yeah, I mean, there were still some pains, but I had to lay down, I couldn’t get up. – [Eric] The catheter. – Oh, I had a catheter
in, ’cause you can’t– – What’s that?
– Catches your pee, so I had a bag of pee.
– ‘Cause you couldn’t pee? – Yeah, because everything’s numb, so you have no control over anything. – Oh my God.
– So it’s like, sucking out your pee. So I had a catheter inside me. I was hooked up to a million things, I had oxygen mask on me, I looked insane. But it got easier once
the epidural happened, it felt like things
progressed really fastly. So like, they came in every hour and they’re like, oh, you’re
six centimeters dilated, or you’re eight centimeters dilated, now you’re ten centimeters, and ten centimeters meant I could push. – And get the baby out?
– Mhmm, so I was stoked, the pitocin worked, the epidural worked. If you are on the fence,
if you’re pregnant, thinking about getting pregnant, if you’re on the fence about an epidural. – Get it?
– Strongly recommend, I strongly, like, I could not have gotten through without the epidural. – Yeah, I don’t know how people do it, I don’t know how anyone does it. – I’m shocked, like, you’re a hero if you get through that without
an epidural, that is crazy. ‘Cause I was able to push out a baby, out of my vagina, without
screaming and crying. I was just focused.
– It was fine? You said, when I came
in, you were just like, yeah, it wasn’t that bad! I was like, really? Just because I thought, since you had such a complicated pregnancy, I was like, oh no, she’s gonna be in pain once that baby comes out, and you’re like, it was good. – Well, I’m in pain now, because– – Oh yeah? I wanna hear about this. You told me briefly when
we were getting our Cokes. – So one thing I was
afraid of was ripping. So I was really scared of vaginal birth, because I was afraid of
things ripping down there, ’cause you hear horror
stories of everything ripping. Well, that’s what I did, so. Basically I pushed for thirty minutes, we started pushing at 5:30 p.m., so my water broke at 5:30 a.m., by 5:30 p.m. I was pushing the baby out. So I only pushed for thirty minutes, which, it’s my first baby, and that’s kind of unheard of, how quick it all happened. Usually with your first baby, you’re at the hospital
overnight trying to push, get ’em out, labor’s really long and hard. That wasn’t my experience. To only be in labor for twelve hours and only active labor, like, super pain, for a few hours, is pretty good. So anyway, I started pushing at 5:30 and he was out by 6:04.
– Oh my God. – So it was only a half
hour pushing, I think. And you push when the contractions come, so it’s not like you’re
pushing for thirty minutes. It’s like, here comes a contraction, three pushes and take a
break for two minutes. Here comes a contraction, three pushes, and then take a break for a minute. You know, so it wasn’t like, constant. I think I pushed maybe a total of eight times, or something. – Do you push like you’re
going to the bathroom? – Yes.
– That’s really how you push? – Yes, that’s how they tell you to push. So the nurse came up to me, and she goes, okay, you’ve heard that women
poop when they give birth? And I was like, yeah, she was
like, and you’ve been told, I don’t want you to be afraid of pooping. I want you to poop.
– Really? – Because that’s the same muscles! She’s like, I want you to poop, push like you have the biggest poop, get it out, like, push out a poop. – Right.
– I was like, okay, and she was like, I want you
to push really, really hard. So basically what an epidural does, it doesn’t make you numb,
it makes your nerves numb. So like, I could feel the baby coming out, I could feel the contractions, but I couldn’t feel pain.
– You felt like it was sliding or something?
– It didn’t feel sliding, it felt tight, it felt like a head coming out of a tight space. It felt like contractions, it felt like things were happening, it felt like I was trying to poop, but there was no pain involved. – That’s good.
– So the epidural just takes away the pain. So I pushed for half an
hour and then he came out, and it was the most
amazing moment of my life, because the second he came out of me, I felt like I came back in my own body, ’cause for nine months
I felt like I wasn’t me, I felt sad and depressed and emotional and awful and miserable
through my whole pregnancy, I hated it, so the second he came out, I literally felt like,
it was like, spiritual, it was like, I felt like a baby. Like the baby came out, and
I came back into my body. – Really?
– It was crazy. And then I was just the happiest
I’ve ever been in my life. – You were, right away?
– Right away, right away the happiest I’ve ever been in my life. – Oh yeah, have you talked about that? Like, how you thought that maybe you’d have postpartum,
like, people warned you? – Yeah, people warned me that I would have postpartum depression, might have it, a lot of women get it, which is, you get a rush of hormones after you have the baby, and sometimes it can be negative, have
a negative effect on you and you can get really super depressed, but I think it was the opposite for me. I think my pregnancy, I had that. In my pregnancy, I was
super depressed and sad, and then, now that I had the baby, I’m like, the happiest I’ve ever been. So I pushed out the baby, and then the doctor’s like, alright,
we have some tearing. So they’re cleaning up the baby, and Eric’s with the baby, and I’m looking at the baby and Eric, and I’m listening to my doctor go, “Okay, I’m gonna check for some tears.” And he goes, “Alright, we have an internal something, something tear,” I didn’t know any of the words he was saying. I was like, okay, I’ve got
one tear, that’s not bad. And he’s like, “We have an external something tear from here to here.” Okay, that’s not bad. Said, “We have a second-degree tear, internal here,” and I was like, okay, three tears, and he kept going. Like, the list, it felt
like it never ended. He’s listing all the tears I have, and then one of the nurses goes, “And a partridge in a pear tree, Jesus!” It’s just like, oh my God! It’s like, oh no! So I literally tore everywhere, from all the way back to the booty. – Did they say why people tear? – Well, because a huge baby’s
coming out of a hole this big! – I know, but why do some
people and not others? It’s just like, luck of the draw? – Well, here’s the tea, is you’re supposed to be stretching out your vagina. Like up until pregnancy you’re supposed to be doing these stretching it out, and massaging it with oils, and doing certain exercises
and all this stuff to strengthen your muscles down there and also to stretch out the skin, and I didn’t do any of that shit. ‘Cause I was like, I’m tired, and I’m not gonna stick
my fingers in there and stretch it out, I don’t wanna do that. So I do recommend doing that stuff, because I know women who did that stuff and they didn’t really tear, so I think, because I didn’t do all that stuff, maybe that’s why, also he has a huge head, like, hats don’t really fit him. But I didn’t feel any of the tearing. If I didn’t have the epidural, I would’ve felt every rip of my vagina. So now, they put in stitches, and the funny thing is, the doctor, we’re like, “How many stitches are there?” and he’s like, “We’ll know when I’m done,” as he’s stitching. So I pushed for one hour, he
stitched me up for an hour. Wait, I pushed, yeah, wait, hold on. Did I get that wrong? I pushed for half an hour, and then he stitched me up for an hour, it took him an hour to stitch everything. – Oh my God.
– Are you gonna throw up your food?
– No, I love it actually, but I feel like I’m very stretched out, so I should be fine if I have a baby. I have like, a gaping hole. (both laughing) – You might be fine. But yeah, mine now is a gaping hole, so now I’m good to go.
– But now you’re stitched, right, you’re tight again? – No, well, there’s a
million stitches in me. You bleed forever, I
gave birth ten days ago and I’m still like, gushing. Sorry, this is so, like.
– Can you have sex? – No, no way.
– No? – Not for six weeks at least.
– Six weeks! – At least.
– I changed my mind, I don’t want a baby. Six weeks!
– Yeah, six weeks at least. – Damn!
– ‘Cause it has to all heal. It’s torn to shreds, like,
everything’s torn to shreds. – I think it’s all taut.
– Do you want your salad? As we talk about gushing
blood out of my vagina. – Being torn to shreds. – [Eric] Thank you. – This video is gonna be
demonetized in five seconds. – No, but it’s like, educational. I feel like when you
have educational stuff, I feel like you could show, I’ve seen live births on YouTube, as in like, from the angle
of the baby coming out. – Really? – Oh, yeah, you can see them on there. So I feel like they let that on there if it’s like, educational. – ‘Cause in my birth
video, I showed the baby like right after he comes out, and he’s like bloody, and
got, like, he looks weird. – Yeah, but you didn’t get
demonetized on that, did you? – But I was worried about it, ’cause it is kind of like, – A lot?
– crazy to see, like, a baby that just came out of you. – Yeah, I know, when they first come out, you’re really lucky ’cause
when they first come out, that can be a li’l crazy,
and even up until six months, I feel like babies look crazy. But yours looks like a person, like it’s got little
eyes and a little nose. – Well, I think he’s
cute, but I’m his mom, so I’m like, he’s awesome.
– No, he’s a cute baby. I’ve seen some ugly
babies, even my own family, we’ll be like, oh no,
they’re some ugly babies. But then they turn cute, but I’ve seen a lot of ugly babies. Even Jason says that,
too, he’s always like, when they’re under a year,
he’s like, they’re not cute. But yours is really cute,
I think certain ones are, and I think yours are, he’s really cute. – Thanks, I think he’s cute.
– Yeah, he’s adorable. – So I don’t know about my tears, or how much or what they are, ’cause every doctor we asked too, and every nurse, ’cause you stay, I stayed in the hospital
for two extra nights, to heal and ’cause my
baby was a preemie baby. He was seven pounds, nine ounces, 29 inches long, I think.
– Wow. – So he’s big, for a
preemie, he’s really big. Moose, what’s wrong? My dog is like, freaking out. Moosey, what’s wrong?
– I think they’re jealous of your baby, ’cause he
gets all the attention now? I feel like that happens with animals. That’s sad. I went to go pet Gus and you’re like, “Be careful, he’s a little biatch!” I was like, oh.
– Well he’s a bitch whether or not I had a baby. He’s just not a nice cat, but I love him. He’s just not nice. But I’m trying to think of
other things I wanted to say. So I don’t know what’s
going on down there, ’cause no one would tell
me, is what I was gonna say. It’s so bad that when
I would ask the nurses, “How bad is it, how many
stitches do I have, what tore?” They’d be like, “It’s really bad.” – They said that?
– That’s what they would say. They wouldn’t tell me what happened, they’d just be like, “Just
know it’s really bad. You need to rest, you need to lay down.” And so, it’s ten days later
and I’m still in a lot of pain, and I can feel, you can feel it all. ‘Cause I’m obviously not
on epidural any more, so now I can feel all the
stitches and the tears. – Wow, you don’t take painkillers? – No, they gave me painkillers. – So you take those?
– Yeah, yeah. – Okay, I was like, “Dang!” ‘Cause it’s probably like, I’ve had, I don’t know how to say it
with getting demonetized, I had vaginal surgery before, and I know I was on painkillers for like, a month after. – Really?
– It hurt so bad. But I didn’t push anything out, I was just getting, you
know, tightened or whatever. But it was so painful,
that’s why I was saying, if you’re not on–
– You got tightened? – Yeah. – Have you talked about that online? – Yeah.
– Okay. – I mean, not really,
but I’ve talked about it in videos before, you know I don’t care. But I just, I couldn’t
pee or anything like that, it was like, so painful. I cried, it just like, burned, it was so awful, I could not pee. I couldn’t, it was just awful. – Oh, girl, the first time I had to poop. (Trisha gasps) ‘Cause I had stitches all
the way up to my butt. – Were you just like, blood? – Gushed, and I sobbed, it hurt so bad. So it took me three days,
I was scared to poop. So I didn’t go for three days, ’cause I was scared to poop, and I could feel that I needed to, and I was like, I just can’t do it. And finally I could, I felt
my body trying to get it out. I was like, I have to get this thing out. I was still at the hospital,
and it was so painful, and I came out of the bathroom and there were two nurses in my room, and I came out and I was just crying. I was like, “That was really painful!” And I was like, “I pooped!”
– Was your baby with you, or were they home?
– No, my baby was with Eric. – In the room?
– Yeah, in the room. – So they stayed?
– Yeah, yeah. – Aw, how nice.
– Yeah, but it was, and even still, now, even
still, pooping is awful, and I know that there
will be tons of blood. It’s horrible.
– That’s so crazy. Did you have, like, a suite? – No, kind of, we got the
biggest postpartum room. So you would give birth in
a labor and delivery room, and then after giving birth, they take you to another section of the hospital called postpartum, and they put you in another room, and that’s where you
stay for a couple days while you’re recovering
and the baby’s recovering, ’cause it’s traumatic
for you and for the baby. It’s traumatic for the baby,
too, to go through that, ’cause their head has to get all misshapen to fit through the canal, so you have to make sure the baby’s okay, you have to make sure you’re okay. But we had one of the bigger rooms, so there was two beds in our room, so I got a hospital bed
and he got a hospital bed, ’cause a lot of times they
don’t give the husbands. – Yeah, that’s what I was wondering, if like, he slept on a chair
or something like that. – Yeah, a lot of times they have to, but we got really lucky,
they had it available. – And you got two people in the room? Usually they only let you have one. – Yeah, so actually we had three, my mom was in there too.
– Wow! – So my mom, my sister and
Eric were all in there with me. – Oh my God.
– And they were great, they were really, really good. I think my favorite part was Rachel, at one point, the epidural made me shiver. – Because, like, cold?
– No, just because. – Just tremble.
– Yeah, just like, brr, like a seizure. So I was kind of doing
that the whole time. – Oh my gosh.
– Which was really weird, I didn’t expect that, and my sister, at one point I was shivering
and I really didn’t feel good and I was in pain, and
my sister came up to me, and I was like, ooh, and she was like, (exaggerated shivering moans) right back in my face,
and it made me laugh, and I was like, okay,
that’s what I needed. I needed, I don’t need like a doula to calm me down and make
me think of rain and earth. I need my sister and
everyone to make me laugh and like, make fun of me. So that was fun, and there was one point, I took it out of the birth video ’cause it was just too gross, but there was one point where like, I had, oh, that’s another
thing I wanted to talk about! Oh my gosh. I like that this whole mukbang is just me talking to you.
– No, I love it, I love it. And me eating as you’re talking about going to the bathroom and bleeding, like, ooh, this pasta’s great. – So this, I really wanted to talk about. When I was pregnant, something
freaked me out big time. I got something called cholestasis, I guess is what it’s called. So I was itching, and I talked about, in my vlogs, I was having scary symptoms, but I never said what they were ’cause I didn’t want people
to Google it and freak out, but I woke up in the middle of the night, like, itchy palms and itchy feet, like, really, really, I
wanted to scrape my skin off. Like I would’ve, happily,
if you gave me a knife, I would’ve cut off my skin, like that’s how bad it itched. And so I thought, oh, what
a weird pregnancy symptom, I’m gonna look that up, and so I looked it up, if I had my phone, I would look it up, so, oh yeah. – You want it over here?
– I’m gonna read to you what I read as a
pregnant, emotional woman. – Oh my God.
– ‘Cause I thought, oh, I’ll look this up and it’ll tell me how to deal with this.
– Did you think you were dying?
– Okay, cholestasis, worse. – Yeah, I think you didn’t tell people, ’cause you know the internet’d
be like, look it up. – I know, and they all the
time were giving me advice, like, I had really bad
congestion my whole pregnancy, like I couldn’t breathe, like, ever, and I remember I would talk about it and be like, I can’t breathe,
I haven’t breathed in months, I think I’m like, dying, and I remember one time someone Tweeted me like, “Have you tried blowing your nose?” And I’m like, “Oh, thanks,
I didn’t think of that. Let me just try that.”
– I could not, I could not. Especially being pregnant, I would go off. You are so tame, I would go off on people. – No, I was trying really hard. Okay, I can’t find what
I saw, I can’t find it. Anyway, so the first thing that popped up when I searched it was, it
sounds like you have cholestasis, I think that’s how you pronounce it, which is, your liver is leaking
bile into your bloodstream, and it can get into the
baby, and what happens when you have it is you
either have early labor, or you have a stillbirth.
– Oh my God. – And so I’m nine months pregnant, thinking my baby’s gonna die, and so I was a disaster, I was sobbing for days and days and days, and we talked to my doctor, he’s like, you’re fine, if you have it, we’re gonna run these blood tests, we’ll give you medicine, you’ll be okay, we’ll monitor the baby,
everything’s gonna be fine. Okay, there we go, ran out of film. – Just stopped recording?
– I just talked too long. So basically my doctor was just like, you’re gonna be fine, we’re
gonna do these blood tests, if you have it, we’ll give you medication, you’re gonna be pretty miserable, the baby’s fine, and
they monitor the baby. We did an ultrasound, we
went to another doctor, she checked on him, she
said he looks great, he’s just really big, which is fine, he was just a fat baby,
which I was and so was Eric, so I got the blood tests done and we were gonna get the
results back five days later. So I had to, for five days,
panic that my baby was gonna die and there was nothing anyone could do. – Oh my God.
– And I was being dramatic, like, the doctors, everyone was like, you are fine, your baby
is fine, we promise, but it’s just, once you
get that in your head. – It’s all you think about?
– It’s all you think about. So even though everyone checked me and we did all the tests,
we did everything right, the doctors were like, everything is fine, still, I was like, I read
that he could die from it, and I just freaked out, so I think that’s why I went into labor early, a month early, because
that’s one of the things that happens when you have that, it happens to one in one thousand women. – Oh, one in one thousand? That’s like, big, though,
that’s not that rare. – So one in one thousand pregnant women get cholestasis in the last
trimester of their pregnancy, and I got it, and five
days later, my water broke. And so it really did
make me go into labor. But it was painful, the itching, it feels like there’s fire ants biting you from underneath your skin. – How long did it last?
– The itching, or? – Yeah, was it constant, all night? – No, it got really bad at night, so all night, I’d wake up itching, I’d wake up holding my foot by my face, itching my feet, like, in
the middle of the night, I’d wake up and I’d be clawing my feet. – I’ve never heard that, I’ve never heard anyone having that. – It was horrible.
– That’s so crazy. – Yeah, it was awful,
but I didn’t tell anyone that I was going through that, because I was like, I don’t
want people to freak out or give me advice, that was
the last thing I needed. – Or even just putting it out there, like oh, well, your
baby will probably die. You know what I mean?
– Yeah, I didn’t want that out there at all, but
that was really scary. But anyway, my doctor came
in when I went into labor and he was like, “Well, I got
your blood test results back, you have it, and I was
about to prescribe you medication for it, but
the only cure for it is actually to give birth.” That’s the cure for the disease,
I guess, is to give birth. So he’s like, “So we’re
doing the cure right now, so you’re fine.”
– Wow, so you did have it. – I did have it, and the
second your baby comes out, by the way, to any mothers wondering or pregnant women wondering,
every symptom goes away. The stuffy nose, the pelvic pain, the stomach pain, the
cramps, the heartburn, the cholestasis, like,
every single symptom I had immediately was gone.
– When you gave birth? – Right when I gave birth,
everything goes away. – Wow, that’s so weird, and you feel, like, totally fine now?
– I feel, well, except for my vagina’s
ripped to shreds, but yes. – You’re not sick, and
you haven’t eaten much, so you’re not super hungry like you were. – No, I’m fine, everything’s great, except for my vagina is destroyed. And kinda my butt, too.
– Ripped too. And the worst part to be destroyed, I couldn’t imagine
pushing something through, like, the surgery alone,
I’ve had twelve surgeries and that surgery alone
was like, never again. Like, that was so stupid.
– Really, it was super bad? – Yeah, I mean, I had a hole, and when I said a gaping
hole, I had a gaping hole, so I had to like, stitch
it back, but yeah. I didn’t have a baby, but still, like, pushing something through, and how much did he weigh?
– Seven pounds, nine ounces. – Oh, that’s not too chunky. – No, he’s fine. I was ten pounds when I was a baby. – That’s a chunky baby. I don’t even know what I was, ten pounds like a bowling ball. – Yeah, it’s huge. But yeah, I can’t believe
he went through that area. Like I can’t believe that happened. – Could you opt for a
C-section if you wanted? – Yeah, anyone can, like, you can, and we honestly wanted to, Eric and I were like, vaginal
birth sounded so scary that we were like, we
want to just cut it out. But the recovery from a
C-section is way harder. – Really, why?
– Because it’s a major surgery and it’s a huge incision, and you know, there can be complications just like there could with any surgery, but we were like, why don’t
we just get a C-section? We kinda wanted one, and then I was like, well, let’s try for vaginal, but just know that if they say, okay, we
need to give you a C-section, I’ll be like, alright.
– Yeah, I guess some people, I think, would wanna, I
feel like I would wanna just give birth just to feel it, like, just to go through it. – Well, epidurals, there’s the thing, is people are like,
“Don’t you wanna feel it? Don’t get an epidural, like,
don’t you wanna feel it?” I’m like, I don’t, but I did feel it. Like, you do feel the baby coming out. – That’s what I was saying, yeah. – Like, you just don’t feel any pain. I felt everything, like,
when they said he’s crowning, I’m like, I can feel that he’s crowning, I could feel his huge head just chilling outside of my vagina, I could feel him come
out completely, like, I felt everything, I just
didn’t feel any pain. – See, that’s what I would want, I would wanna feel it but not be in pain. I wanna be natural, yeah.
– Yeah, so you would be an epidural girl.
– How do you get the water? How do you put, like, a water birth? – Um, yeah, I don’t know, you just sit in a bathtub and push it out. – That’s what I would wanna do. – I don’t know, I didn’t even consider it. I was laying in the bed, just like. See, water birth, I don’t know if you can do with an epidural, though. – Oh, you’ve gotta do it natural? – Because I don’t know if the
thing can go in the water, the epidural thing.
– Oh yeah, probably not. – And also your legs are
numb, you can’t walk. ‘Cause after I gave birth,
they took me to the next room, and I was like, I have to pee, and so they took me in with
like a walker wheelchair thingy, and I felt fine ’cause I
still had the drugs in me, and so they were like, “Alright, so now you’re gonna lift yourself up off the wheelchair and get on the toilet.” And I was like, okay,
so I kind of stood up, and they’re like, “Hold
onto the handrail,” and I was like, I’m fine, and I like, as I was putting my hand
onto the handrail, collapsed. ‘Cause my legs were numb
and I didn’t even know. – Oh my gosh, that’s so crazy. I didn’t know they went numb. I had actually no idea
what an epidural was. I thought it was like a painkiller. – Yeah, well, it is a painkiller, it’s confusing, it’s
like, I say they were numb because they were, but I could feel them. Like, I just couldn’t, my nerves, I don’t know how to explain it, ’cause I could feel my legs, it’s not like, like, if you touched it, I could feel that, but I
don’t know how to explain it. There’s just no pain, and I
couldn’t walk on them, I’d fall. It’s really weird.
– It’s probably like, when you get liposuction,
or your butt done, because they put a big needle and kill all your nerves
when you get liposuction, and you can’t feel it, like, you can literally not feel it. You know what I mean,
maybe that’s how it is. – How is liposuction? – I feel like, ’cause
they take a big needle, have you ever seen it, like on Snapchat? – No.
– They just take a big needle and they kill all your nerves,
like, all your fat cells, and so they just go in
and out, in and out, and so you’re all bruised
up and you’re numb for like, I don’t know,
maybe a month or two, and even your arms, so
nothing can hurt it, everything, your butt, you
can’t sit on your butt, you gotta like, lay on
your side and stuff, ’cause you literally can’t feel it. – What was the most painful thing besides the vagina?
– The lipo on your stomach, because they kill so many
nerves and fat cells. Like, you can’t feel it, and
then you feel your nerves starting to come back over the month, and then it feels like you just, you know when you sit on your leg? That’s what it feels like on your stomach. Is that what yours felt like? When you sit on your leg and it goes numb? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, it feels like that. It feels like before the tinglies come, you know when it goes to sleep, and then it starts to come
back and tingles a little bit? – Okay, yeah.
– It feels like right before the tingles come back. – Yeah, that’s a weird feeling, though, I don’t like those feelings. – You might not like the epidural then. – Yeah, I probably just
shouldn’t have pregnancies so I don’t have babies in me. – No, you might love
it, you might love it, you might have the best pregnancy ever and love it.
– No, I was such a baby, I don’t think I could, like, even when I get my Botox it’s like no, it hurts so bad I could pass out. – Really?
– Yeah, I’m really a baby when it comes to pain, but. – Oh, then you wouldn’t like it. – Hire a surrogate. – Yeah, well, I wouldn’t do it again. – What?
– Uhn-uhn. – Have a baby? You just want one? – No, we want more kids,
we wanna adopt, probably. (Trisha cooing) But I could not do it again, like, that’s how horrible my pregnancy was, that’s how traumatic it was, I couldn’t do it again.
– Wow, that’s breaking news, oh my gosh.
– Yeah, no, but we want more kids, I love having a baby, and I love kids, I’ve
always wanted to be a mom, so I’m like excited about more kids, but the thought of going, and who knows, maybe in three months I’ll
be like, I don’t care! But right now, the birth
I could do again, easy. I could do the birth
again, give me an epidural, I can bust out another baby. The pregnancy was so traumatic for me, I could never do that again.
– Really? – It was horrible, ’cause it wasn’t just physically painful for nine months, it was emotionally and mentally horrible. Like, the amount of
times Eric had to hug me and tell me, like,
everything was gonna be okay, ’cause I was this sobbing disaster. It was not good. – That’s so interesting, that it was like, that bad that you
wouldn’t have another one. – No, I would not.
– Crazy, ’cause like, Jessica’s all like, “I’m
ready for another baby!” I was like, don’t you have four kids? – Um, I feel like we
didn’t really eat a lot. – I literally had three. – I was like, going like this.
– No, I know, we actually did eat a lot, ’cause Cheesecake Factory. I ate all my chicken. You want any of mine, or are you good? – No, I’m full, I’m
looking at that cheesecake. – Yes, yes, let’s eat some, I didn’t know. – I didn’t, oh, shoot,
well here’s one fork. So anyway, do you have any
questions about anything, or did I answer everything? ‘Cause I feel like I said everything. – No, no no no, I feel like there’s, I feel like I have a thousand questions. There’s this one, and
then there’s plain one, I don’t wanna spill that.
– This is gonna be, like, a three-hour mukbang.
– I love watching long videos, I love ’em. Okay, so.
– This is the Oreo one. We didn’t even say what we were eating. – We just started eating. Okay, so, you answered a lot, actually, ’cause I don’t know anything about birth. Oh, well, I’ll ask you the one, I asked Jason, this is,
Jason was literally like, are you serious? ‘Cause I feel like I’m really smart, I feel like I know a lot
about a lot of things, but Colleen texted me and she asked. Oh my God, I should try your breast milk. Do I have to latch on, or can you do it? – No! (both laughing) You don’t have to latch on, I need to squirt it into like, a cup. – Oh, okay. Why do you get milk in your
boobs when you’re pregnant? – Why do you get milk in them? To feed the baby! – But how does that come about? – Well, your body just knows. The female body is crazy.
– It just naturally does it? – Naturally does it, just like, when you get pregnant, your body naturally knows to grow a placenta, knows to push all your organs, so like, all of my organs, so
like, your intestines, your stomach, your everything
gets squished up to like here, so when I was pregnant,
my stomach was up here, all my intestines were squished up here, my abs ripped apart
and were here and here, like it all goes out of the
way so the baby can grow. So your body knows to do that, so your boobs know, and actually, what happens in your boobs
when you’re pregnant, not all women can produce
milk when they’re pregnant, usually it happens after the baby came. I’m a super milk machine,
so I have a lot of milk, and I have been producing
milk for a couple months, but it’s not milk at first,
it’s called colostrum, it’s yellow, it looks like a thick pee. – In your boobs?
– Mhmm, it’s like thick, yellow, like neon yellow,
it’s called colostrum, and it’s got tons of like, protein in it to make the baby grow. So you have a puppy,
so you feed puppy food, or you feed kitten food
to kittens and puppies, and then when they get older, you feed ’em different food. That’s ’cause kitten food and
puppy food is full of fat, to make the baby kitten
or puppy grow faster. It’s the same thing with babies, it’s like colostrum is full of things to make the baby grow fast, and then after a few
days, your milk comes in. So now I’m doing milk.
– Oh, okay. – So now it’s white, now it’s milk. – So now it’s like, tasty?
– Well it was tasty then, too. – Did you try it?
– Yeah, I did. – I love it, I love the idea. I don’t know, I also like
watching people breastfeed. People always have this
weird thing about it, but I think it’s so amazing, I’m like, wow, that’s person’s
eating off another person! – I love it.
– It’s so interesting to me, ’cause I always feel like the worst. – It’s painful,
breastfeeding’s really painful. – Yeah, that’s what I heard, too. – It’s getting better now
’cause I’m getting used to it, and he’s getting better at it, but it hurts.
– So crazy. – ‘Cause it’s like your
nipple being sucked for like twenty-ish minutes
every two hours for days, so it’s like sucked, hard sucking, raw, every hour or two to three hours, whatever your baby, however
much your baby eats, sucking it raw for like
twenty-ish minutes. – I can’t even imagine.
– So of course, no matter how good you are at breastfeeding,
your nipples get sore. – When you were in the hospital, so, I like Lifetime movies, and so I always feel like when you give birth, did you stay with the baby the whole time? How did you know they
didn’t switch your baby? – I stayed in the room the whole time. – You stayed in the room? The baby stayed in the room? – The baby was in my room the whole time. They don’t take it away, so. – [Eric] Or I was with him. – What? Or, or he was with him. So yeah, so we never
wanted either one of us to be away from the baby, one of us always had to be with the
baby, that was our rule. And the hospital was, of
course they were great. They also put sensors, they put bracelets on Mommy, Daddy and baby that all match, so we all have the same serial number, they put an ankle bracelet on the baby that sets off an alarm if it goes near the doors of the hospital. – Okay, ’cause I wondered, you always hear about babies being stolen or switched. – Well, that I guess has happened, and so that’s why they have
crazy security measures now. – I like the name Flynn, too, it reminds me, did you name
him Flynn ’cause of Tangled? – No, we named him Flynn
’cause it’s a family name, so it’s in his family, his great-great-great-great-grandfather was a captain of a ship,
and his name was John Flynn, and the name kept getting passed down. It’s Eric’s middle name,
it’s his dad’s middle name, so we knew we wanted
to pass down that name, but we didn’t know if we wanted it to be his first name or not. And then it just kept coming
back, we couldn’t decide. We had a bunch of
different names picked out, and then we were at the hospital and we were like, we don’t
have a name for this baby, like, what are we gonna name this baby? And I asked him to get
something out of my purse, and in my purse was a little pin that we bought when we were in Ireland, ’cause I was pregnant
when we were Ireland, and we got a little pin that said Flynn, ’cause at the time we liked
the name Flynn for a baby, and so we bought it, thinking, oh, if we name him Flynn,
we’ll have this little cute pin from Ireland that we can give him, and we put it in my
purse, forgot about it. Like, I barely remember buying that. And then we were at the hospital, and he found it and pulled it out, he was like, oh my God. We hadn’t seen it since
we were in Ireland. – Oh my God.
– It was like a sign, we were like, that’s gotta be his name. – Yeah, you didn’t have
a name for him, right? The first couple days? – Yeah, no, we were calling him Baby. I call him Bunny.
– Aw, that’s cute. He does look like a little
bunny with his little nose. – Yeah, he’s a little cutie. So anyway, maybe I should have him say hi. – Yes!
– Is he asleep? – [Eric] Well, speaking of
mukbangs, he might need a boob. – Oh, is he needing a booby? Come here, Bunny. D’you need a booby? Are you sleepy, bub, d’you need a boob? – I think he might have your nose, though. – He does have my nose, for sure. My big honkin’ nose.
– No, it’s so cute. – I love you. Alrighty, well, we’re gonna go. Thanks for being here.
– Oh my God, thanks, I’m so excited.
– Sorry this whole mukbang was just me talking for an hour, I know you didn’t say anything. – No, we’ve been meaning to get together, and it was just always
like, missing each other, so I was like, I love you. This is fitting, ’cause before
you announced your pregnancy, we did this cheesecake.
– I know! We did Cheesecake Factory mukbang, and then I announced my pregnancy. – And now you have the baby,
and now we’re doing another! – I know, I thought about that, that was part of the reason I was like, we should just do cheesecake,
’cause that was like, yeah. – This is crazy. Literally last time I saw you, it was when I found out you were pregnant. – I know, last time you saw me, we had a mukbang, ate Cheesecake Factory, and you found out I was pregnant while we were doing the mukbang. – I know, I know, that was so crazy. – And now here he is.
– Oh my God, he’s so cute. – He’s so cute. Alright, well, thanks for watching, go subscribe to Trisha and
follow her on her things, and goodbye.
– Subscribe to Flynn. – Subscribe to Flynn’s YouTube channel! We’re trying to get him to a million subscribers before his first birthday. Love you guys, bye!
– Bye!

100 thoughts on “MY INTENSE BIRTH STORY! – Mukbang w/ Trisha Paytas

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *