I Am King Tut (Pharaoh Tutankhamun)

I Am King Tut (Pharaoh Tutankhamun)


Here I lie, The strong bull, pleasing of birth,
the one of perfect laws, who wears the crown and pleases the gods, lord of all… now dead. After bearing witness to only eighteen floodings
of the live giving sacred waters of the Nile, I am laid to rest in my tomb with the objects
that I will need most in the afterlife. My favorite foods, perfumes, weapons of war,
and of course, my golden death mask, an everlasting and eternal tribute to my power. For I am a perfect image of humanity – strong,
powerful, the savior of Egypt, pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty, a living God. I am Tutenkhamun. But that is not the name by which I was always
known. No, it pains me to admit that my father, the
Pharaoh Akhenaten and his sister-wife, first named me Tutankhaten, living image of the
god Aten. My father was a heretic and above all a fool. He threw Egypt into great turmoil and distress
when he forswore the ancient gods who had guided us since creation and declared that
Aten, the golden disc of the sun, was the true chief deity, and even moved the capital
from Thebes to the new city of Akhetaten. My father was judged harshly for his crimes
against the gods. Following his death, the cult of Aten diminished,
his capital city was abandoned, the temples and monuments he built for his god were torn
down, his face was chiseled off of his statues, and his name was erased from the official
list of kings ensuring that his memory would die with him. In the eyes of Egypt, the people, and the
gods, my father faced a fate even worse than death, he ceased to exist. I ascended to the throne while I was still
a boy, but let there be no doubt that I was always in charge. My advisors may have attempted to take advantage
of my youth, but when you are the living incarnation of a god there is no question who ultimately
rules. I immediately took to restoring Egypt to its
past glory, fixing the mistakes of my father who had allowed our kingdom to languish as
he pursued his blasphemous goals. My first, and most important duty, was to
reject the sun god, Aten. For too long the old gods has been neglected
and ceased to hear our prayers. From here on I would no longer bear the name
my father gave me, but be born anew as Tutankhamun, the living image of the true god. I set about the restoration of the old pantheon
– Horus, Isis, and of course, my namesake, Amun, would again be worshipped as the chief
deities of Egypt and bestow us once more with their blessings. I built temples and monuments dedicated to
them, moved our capital back to the sacred city of Thebes, reinstated their holy festivals,
reestablished their cults, and brought their divine favor back to Egypt. I would be remembered throughout eternity
as the king who “spent his life in fashioning images of the gods.” Though pious, I was far from meek. While much of my time was dedicated to bringing
the gods back to Egypt, I also sought to bring Egypt’s military back to its former might. I lead my army full of the worlds’ finest
archers and charioteers to victory in many battles, where my peerless skill with the
bow was put on display for all to see as we slew countless of the neighboring Nubians. Alas, not every chapter of my life was such
a resounding success. Neither of the children I bore survived childbirth. Perhaps the gods did not favor my sister-wife,
Ankhesenamun, as they did me. As is our tradition, their bodies were mummified
and they would be placed with me in my own tomb so that we may all live together in the
afterlife. My own life was also cut tragically short. Perhaps the gods needed me more in the Duat,
the land of the dead, than they did on this mortal plain. But at least I was able to die doing what
I loved most in the world, hunting the sacred animals of the Nile. I faced off against an incarnation of the
chaos god himself, Seth, here taking the form of an enraged hippopotamus. I crept through the reeds, readying my powerful
bow to strike when suddenly it charged at me, and despite my martial prowess I was gravely
wounded, my leg mangled by the beast. I was rushed back to my palace but it was
too late. The wound festered and soon I would return
to the realm beyond this life and take my place among the gods. The Pharaoh, as well as the entire kingdom’s
most important task in life is to make certain that the king has a proper tomb to ensure
his successful journey from this world to the next. Though my untimely death meant that the process
must be accelerated, my tomb was still given all of the finest trappings of the land and
no expense was spared by the people to leave no doubt that their glorious and loved king
would face no troubles on his journey to the underworld. As a living embodiment of a god, who lead
his people to a glorious new age, my tomb and my legacy will last a thousand floodings
of the Nile. Generation after generation will read my name
in the list of pharaohs and look upon my face at the monumental temples built to celebrate
my magnificence. Unlike my father, who was erased from the
annals of our history, I have achieved the greatest glory possible for a pharaoh, I have
become eternal. My name will live on forever throughout the
ages and all will know me. For I… Am Tutenkhamun.

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