EMS Obstetric – Delivery Simulation (No Complications)


Here, the baby is crowning. You don’t have
to touch the mom at all; you can just watch for the head. Except if she’s pushing really
fast and hard, you may want to put your hand on the baby’s head lightly as so she doesn’t
injure her perineum or tear excessively and — cause you like the most controlled delivery
as possible. Usually, the babies that come fast are the ones that are not the first time
mom. Usually those moms have to push a few minutes, a half-hour, an hour; but the second,
third, fourth babies… Those are the babies that come really fast and sometimes just kind
of explode out. You can see this baby is coming, and have the mom, like, take some deep breaths
in between the contractions; she doesn’t have to push the baby out completely. Just let
her go at her own pace and how she feels the pressure. This baby’s coming right now, and
the first thing that’s going to come out is the baby’s face, hopefully, and you’re going
to have your bulb syringe ready and you’re going to depress the bulb syringe and suction
the baby’s mouth out first. See the baby is exposed here… there is a cord here; wait
until the baby is completely out. See if you can separate that cord around the baby’s head
nicely like this. Okay, now you can tell the mom, “Stop pushing,” and you can suction the
baby’s mouth out — pull it out (squish it out there) cause this is what the first gulp
of air they take in they can aspirate into the lungs, and that’s why that’s important.
It’s not so important to do the nose, but you can gently just go to the nose and squish
some of that out. So, as you deliver the anterior shoulder, which means the top shoulder first,
and you bring that out and then the rest of the baby will come out. Again you’re going
to suction the baby’s mouth out. Tell the mom, “You did a great job. Do some deep breathing.”
You don’t have to clamp the cord right away. In fact, if you leave it pumping for about
two or three minutes, that gives the baby a little extra blood, which may be beneficial
to the baby. And, when you use your clamp, just clamp it in two different spots and then
cut in between. Leave enough of umbilical cord in case the doctors do have to insert
umbilical vein/artery catheter in case the baby needed some IV fluids or whatever, so
don’t cut it too short. In a few minutes, the placenta may deliver; it may not. I would
not tug on it; don’t pull on the cord. Again, get her to the hospital and staff there can
deal with that. It’s not necessary to get that delivered. Give yourself a pat on the
back and put the baby on the mom’s tummy. Dry the baby off; that’s the most important
thing. Hopefully, the baby’s crying. If not, that would be the next important thing to
do is stimulate the baby by drying the baby and, once the baby’s turning pink and moving,
again give the baby to the mom and have her do skin-to-skin. If she wants to try breast
feeding, she can; otherwise, just put a nice warm blanket around both mom and baby, but
make sure she’s skin-to-skin with the baby.

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