Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Takeaways

Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Takeaways


TINA MARTIN: I just want to
give each of the speakers an opportunity to give us
maybe one or two takeaways from this one. Wanda, we’ll start with you. WANDA BARFIELD: So I think that
there’s a lot that we can do. But one area that’s
really critical for states is to think about insuring
risk-appropriate care. We need to standardize
and improve care to ensure that all
women are delivering at the right place at the right
time and the right hospital. TINA MARTIN: Ana? ANA LANGER: Yes. I would like to emphasize that
the US is part of the globe, and that we should break
that silo, too, and think about maternal health
for all women everywhere, or women’s health, if we
want to be more inclusive. So that’s one key message that
I would like to share with you. And another one that comes from
low and middle-income country sees that many of
those countries have made maternal health
care free and available for all women, and
those countries are much poorer than the US. So I think it’s quite
appalling to think that so many women still face
financial barriers to have access to quality care
in a timely fashion. So what can I say? I want to encourage us all to
push so all women in the US have free access to
maternal health care. TINA MARTIN: Thank you. Haywood: HAYWOOD BROWN: We
have to re-educate on the importance of
the postpartum visit, and postpartum follow-up,
and early postpartum follow-up for all
women, irrespective of where they live. We know that women
who are poor are less likely to show up for
their postpartum visit, mainly because of barriers. And we need to make
sure that that’s emphasized at the time of
discharge from the hospital that the patient understands
the importance of it, providers understand
importance of it, and assistants understand
the importance of that visit. And we need to be
able to have coverage for women for an extended
postpartum period. It’s not a one-episode visit. It really is seeing the patient
when she needs to be seen. TINA MARTIN: Susan? SUSAN MANN: It’s
always hard to go last. Everyone’s been some
fabulous [INAUDIBLE].. TINA MARTIN: No,
you’re not last. Karen’s last. SUSAN MANN: Oh, I’m sorry. Sorry. I forgot about your, Karen. I apologize. You’ll have a hard
time, I promise. [LAUGHTER] However, I think really,
it’s this maternal mortality thing is so multifactorial,
and hospitals really need to be held accountable
for their state of preparedness and their ability to respond
to emergencies as they arise, regardless of who
the patient is, what color she is,
where she gives birth. It needs to be across the board
a level of accountability, like I said, from the
C-suite all the way down to the front line caregivers. TINA MARTIN: Karen,
final thoughts? KAREN SCOTT: Two. So I really want to advocate and
hold, again, as we’re saying, systems accountable
for, I’m going to say, the cultural rigor, and
humility, and responsiveness, and the scientific integrity
and validity of our work, and also to dismantle
the silos, to invest in public health
and social sciences as transdisciplinary approaches
that really center and uplift the voices and knowledge and
expertise of our black mothers and birthing people.

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