Babies at Sunnybrook

Babies at Sunnybrook


On-screen text: Sunnybrook logo. Title: From conception to Delivery – Sunnybrook’s New Women and Babies Program Marion DeLand: I’d like to welcome everybody to the new Women and Babies Program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, opening on September 12, 2010. Families that come to our new environment will be greeted with bright space, state-of-the-art environments technology that is buried within the friendly confines and supportive environment so that it’s not always in your face. What they can look forward to is an early-labour assessment, where they will come in and be assessed by staff to determine, do they stay, do they go home… so that women aren’t spending additional time in hospital that they don’t need to spend. If it’s decided that they’re going to stay they’ll be put into a birthing room, so if they are low-risk, they will be able to labour, deliver and recover in the same room. They are big rooms, they have lots of space, there will be room for family. If they’re high-risk, they will labour in that room, they may deliver in another room, so they may have to go to an operating room. When they have their baby when the baby is taken to the NICU assessment room they will be able to watch what we’re doing through a close-circuit TV. Once the mum’s had her baby and she’s high-risk she will go to a mother-baby unit the maternal newborn unit and stay there, or she may go back to the high-risk floor, before discharge. The baby will be brought down to the NICU, and admitted into one of these baby spaces. So the baby will be brought down, put into an incubator– an isolette–and have his or her own space and behind the curtain is space for the family. So there’s a separate entrance for mum and dad. Some of the things you will find in the NICU for example is a whiteboard that families can leave messages for other family members, write phone numbers on, and there will be a television that you can watch. There’s pumping space for mums to pump breast milk. Each of the pods, and in the follow-up clininc, have a constant theme of twinkly lights. There is the ability for parents to come and go how they please; they will have their own private entrances to the baby spaces. I think the follow-up clinic is something that is really, really important. We follow babies that need to be followed up until 6 years of age. It’s special, it’s state-of-the art, it’s a different way of providing care to high-risk babies, it’s trying to be as non-hospital as we can possibly, and be as patient-focused and family-focused, and it’s important that the families are part of the team. And that’s what we’ve tried to build. Visit our blog at Sunnyview.sunnybrook.ca.

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