Are You and Your Family Ready For Fall Sports & Activities? BestHealth Podcast Ep. 14

Are You and Your Family Ready For Fall Sports & Activities?   BestHealth Podcast Ep. 14


This is the best health podcast brought
to you by wake forest baptist health in partnership with MedCost.
Good day everyone. Welcome to the latest best health podcast
brought to you by wake forest baptist health. And we’re glad that you’re tuning into
this episode and we have a very special guest that’s going to
talk to us about, um, youth sports injury
prevention with youth. Um, very important topic. Um, as we, as we head back to school, um, so with us as Dr Brian [inaudible] and
he is visiting from one of our wake forest health network locations. So
welcome Dr. Riley. Thanks Justin. Glad to be here. Yeah,
so, um, Dr [inaudible], we’re going to get into a
lot of fun, fun topics, um, hopefully helping families out, um, as, as we go back to school for
fall sports and, um, we’re, we’re going to get into
a plethora of, of items. There’s a whole lot we can
talk about with this topic, but we’ll try and narrow it
down for everyone listening. Um, but before we do that, just tell us a
little bit about yourself. Um, you know, how long you’ve been with wake
forest baptist. Um, you know, why, why did you want to become a doctor?
When did you want to become a doctor? So, um, I grew up in the Midwest and came to
North Carolina to train at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Um, I’ve
been a doctor for 20 years now. Nice. The first four of which I spent as a
resident and fellowship right here, uh, in Winston Salem. And um, I’ve always been interested in sports. It’s been one of the most fun things
for me to do as a medical student and a resident in training and a and ongoing
in my, uh, community, uh, ever, ever since. Sure. So, um, you’re at one of our family
medicine offices, is that correct? Wake forest health network in Canova,
North Carolina over in North Carolina. There you go. So, um, at,
um, a practice such as that, do you see, um, you see the whole
family, their kids, adults, everybody. We do a whole range of patients
from brand new babies to, uh, I have a lady who’s 104 years
old, rock and roll. God bless her. That’s awesome. Um, so we’re gonna move into a little
bit of injury prevention and, um, my boys are excited to start a basketball
clinic this fall and a lot of kids are doing all kinds of different sports.
Um, we’ve seen certain sports, um, that are traditionally had
been more popular here, such as soccer and basketball and
maybe youth football. And then, um, some other ones that are
gained popularity in more, more recent times such as Lacrosse
perhaps. Um, but there’s also, um, my goddaughter would remind me
that dance is a, is a sport. Um, so she is, she’s a pretty, pretty fit. So it takes a lot of physical fitness
to do some of the dance routines. She does. Absolutely. Um,
so, uh, we’ll just talk, talk a little bit about,
um, how you recommend youth, particularly those beginning
to play organized sports,
prepare for a season, um, to help reduce injury before it even
happens? That’s a good question. Most sports organizations require
some kind of a sports physical, um, going into a season, um, whether
it’s for school or club, uh, or travel organizations. Sure. I think that’s probably a great idea
because it can be a way to, to reset and, uh, see what’s happened
over the last year. Hopefully somebody has a physician
who is another third party adult, like a teacher or a coach who’s, who’s got a set of eyes outside
of the family. Um, and is, uh, reviewing how the, the young player or a participant
got to this point and, uh, what we need to look for, uh,
in the coming year. Gotcha. So, um, you mentioned sports
physicals that I know, um, uh, different organization ends in leagues
have different different rules and regulations, but it seems as though specifically to
with North Carolina High School Athletic Association, they’ve gotten really
strict, um, and rightfully so about, um, having physicals done and the
proper paperwork done and, um, for contact sports, um, the
concussion paperwork done. Um, so I think we can all agree that
getting a sports physical, uh, is pretty important ahead of out of the
season that youth are getting ready to participate in. Um, in
your experience, um, when you, when you are going
through and offering physicals, um, what are some of the things that
maybe, you know, of, uh, 12, 14, 16 year old comes in and thinks
he or she is perfectly healthy, they look healthy but maybe something,
you know, pops up. Um, what, what are some of those,
uh, common, common, uh, topics or, or conditions that, sure.
My pop pop during the physical that we, we not, we might not expect. I think before something bad
happens on a quarter a field. Um, we get a chance both by history
that’s provided for a physical exam. Uh, and, and just in the exam
itself, um, to identify some issues. Primarily what would jump out is his
heart and lung issues were sports, probably put these organs to more of
a test then daily life. Sure. And, um, we need to know is there a new murmur? Is there a wheezing or
a breathing problem, uh, that someone may not appreciate for, uh, how significant will be once
they step on a field. Um, there are other family histories that
might tip us off to a want to make sure that if we need extra diagnostic
testing or evaluation kind of to ensure somebody’s safety going
into a season. Gotcha. Um, so I have an old, um, flag football
injury from college. Right. Um, so I’m sure maybe that
pops up as a topic is, is some old injuries that
might not be fully healed or, or identifying those that might be
helpful to identify ahead of time before they, they go back on the field
or the court. Right. Sure. And that goes back to
your, your first question. I think about preparing
ahead of the season. Um, sometimes an athlete, even
though they had a sprained ankle, they feel like it’s a thing in the past. They don’t realize that that’s the number
one risk factor for getting another sprained ankle. Oh, there you go. So your question probably deserves
some idea of a fitness preparation. Uh, you know, stretching, trying to do
some things ahead of time to get ready. Um, the organized things that you
were talking about with the schools. That’s pretty important. And there’s coordination that won’t all
necessarily happen right at your sports physical, uh, with your doctor
on site at a time. Sure. To work with the athletic
trainers at school. Um, you know, if they have physical therapy
involved there or you know, your coaches and administrative
staff. Um, but you’re right, there’ll be concussion protocols and
advanced paperwork like that case. We need something to
compare back to later. Um, but so many issues like a previous
pulled muscle, a previous injury, you can stay out of trouble by, by getting ready before you hit those two
a days in 85 degree weather and really busting your tail. Yeah.
So that’s a great point. I was actually talking with one of our
athletic trainers at a local high school not too long ago and, um,
the, the students were, were practicing earlier in the
morning because of the heat and, um, he said that the, um, back to preparation that some of the
students weren’t hydrating or getting the proper nutrition, especially since
they’re practicing in the morning. So I’m sure that’s something you advise
youth on as well. Right? Absolutely. Um, I remember horror stories from my
dad’s generation of coaches denying, uh, players, uh, drinks
as a punishment, uh, til they worked harder or ran more laps
or suicides or whatever it would be. Yeah. We all know better than
that these days, you know, and the athletes need to be pre
hydrating and the morning of an event, they need to carry extra
water with them. Uh, I know that the coaches in the schools
and everybody are prepared and supportive of, of that in a way that we
need to recognize because,
uh, in a year like this, particularly as hot as it
is and the humidity, um, a lot of people who normally, even if you are fit or
you’re prepared for a season, you might have difficulty in
these conditions. And so that’s, I’m glad to hear that they’re preparing
and practicing early and trying to avoid some of the dangers associated
with that. Sure. Um, and I think as, as,
especially if you’re, uh, you’re able to develop a
relationship with your patients if, if they’re coming to one of our family
medicine clinics such as yours and called over one of our, our many other locations, I think we have locations from ash
county all the way down to Asheboro, um, if, if anyone is in need to, to
see a family medicine provider. Um, but I think one of the cool things, and it might be kind of going back to
kind of the older generation of, you know, not necessarily needing to feel like
they have to go to the doctor every four, even at a checkup. And this relates
to youth as well as adults. You know, that may, they might not
see the importance of having
a primary care physician. Um, but can you talk to us a little bit
about that, of, of the importance of, of developing that relationship and
that history and the providers such as yourself being able to help guide
the patient and, and offer them, um, sound advice based on their history.
I love this question. Thank you. Um, because as sports physical, sometimes we picture that mill that runs
through hundreds of kids to get ready and that might be important because
everybody needs it at a deadline. Sure. On the other hand, um, we already gave away my timing that
I’ve been in one location for 16 years, which means I’ve had
the opportunity to, uh, prepare kids for kindergarten for their
sixth or seventh grade immunizations and, and preparation before middle
school sports, high school sports, and then sending them off to
college. Oh, that’s awesome. And it’s some of my most fun
interaction because again, those are relationships that even like
I mentioned to other third party adults, like a coach or a teacher don’t have
the span of someone’s life that I do and that relationship that I can have, uh, with these young people over some
really important transitions. So, uh, for me, um, that’s really one of the joys of
family medicine in general. Um, by 11 or 12, I start asking kids at their physical how
much they’re smoking in the hopes that they laugh and chuckle and side. I look to their mother for help of why I
would ask such a silly question. Right, right. I want them to always
know that it’s a silly question. They should never have to answer yes to
that as it’s easier never to start than to have to stop. Yes. Um,
but, uh, beyond that, uh, all the different transitions about
safety issues and just growth and development and, uh, it is a neat thing for me to
send someone off to college. And most of my patients who’ve done that, they still have an ability and
they know if they need something, they can get ahold of me if they have
questions or concerns arise wherever they are and that next step to.
Yeah. And so, you know, I would encourage people if they don’t
have a primary care physician, um, to, to get one, and there’s plenty of plenty of
information on that on our website, on wake health.edu. Um, but I
think it goes to um, you know, helping understand and maintain,
um, if, if certain kids have, um, chronic conditions, I know that asthma is relatively
common or allergies that are, uh, relatively common that might flare up if
they’re out participating in sports and in your help able to, to help manage
that all along the way. Correct. Absolutely. Um, that’s almost like having the
previous injuries or what not. Your asthma may be perfectly contained, but you get out on those fresh cut fields
or even the turf ones with the little black pebbles in them. Yeah. Different things will trigger an
asthmatic to have trouble. Interesting. And if you know it ahead of time,
then there’s things you can do to, to avoid getting tight and losing the
ability to play your game and your maps the way you like to. Sure. Well,
I’m Dr Viridian, we’re going to, we’re going to wrap up here in a
minute. Um, but before we wrap up, um, talk to us a little bit about,
um, I wanted to touch base on this. I was talking with one of the, uh, local coach here and they said
that youth, um, adolescents, um, what they’re seeing, um, sometimes also includes not
necessarily physical condition, a spraining colony, but maybe they’d been playing a sport a
long time and they’re starting to feel a little burnout or, or stress. Um, that’s something that they
can talk to with their, their family medicine providers
such as yourself too. Correct. I think that the mental health issues
around how demanding it is these days, especially when we’re talking about
middle school and high school, um, age young people, there’s a lot of stress
and it’s a different world
than it used to be even for you and I growing up. So everyone has access to the
world’s information in their phone, but sometimes a lack of
communication interpersonally. And I really like that
my patients have me, they have their coaches,
they have their trainers, and hopefully that kind of
connection can go a long way. I encourage all of the kids at my annual
checkups to be the master of their phone and not let the
device master them. We, um, can get into some other mental
health issues if it’s needed to about, um, even you can use it, you can
turn it around and use the app, uh, on apps on the phone, um,
such as calm or headspace or, um, 10% happier if someone does need a
connection because they’re having some stress. But with sports, absolutely. Um, sometimes we put so much pressure
on one sport and we’re focused, um, in a a laser beam, I have to be the best whichever
kind of sport I play. And, um, I still think there’s a lot of benefit
to being a multi-sport athlete. Um, you know, I watch some of the,
uh, professional teams even, uh, um, a lot of pitchers in major league baseball
played college football or some other sport. Um, and I think that
kind of cross training is, is good for injury prevention. Um, and maybe it will help prevent some of
the burnout and those other issues that you’re alluding to. Yeah,
I think that’s great. I’ve, I’ve seen it pay off for a
number of, of people, uh, recently going into the drafts. So
we’ll tie sport. It can be beneficial. Uh, so, uh, we’re, we’re getting
ready to wrap up as I said. Um, but I was talking to another doctor and
I want to get your take on this just real quick. I think y’all, you know, you love what you do and
you would much rather, um, help with preventative medicine and, and having someone come in regularly
and you be their primary care physician and, and keeping someone healthy
as opposed to trying to help them, um, once they’re already sick or
once they already have an injury, it, it’s beneficial to prevent it in
the first place. As I correct, I, I tried to talk to all of these, you know, growing up people and becoming
adult people, uh, about, uh, what I think of as
foundational habits. Um, it’s a difficult time to get
the right amount of sleep. It’s, it’s a great time to
start focusing on nutrition. It’s a wonderful time to develop, uh, exercise habits so that there’s a, the amount of physical activity they
carry so much, um, mental and, uh, stress and anxiety relief and better
concentration and better sleep at night. So many things come with those
combination of sleep, right, eat right exercise appropriately.
And um, and you’re right, I spend a lot of time, um, motivating and discussing, uh, these issues with people so
that they can live a fulfilling, rewarding life that’s not
just putting out fires. Yes, that’s good wisdom. Um, so I,
we’ll, we’ll close there with that. The why is nuggets. Um, Dr [inaudible], thanks for joining us today. I
really appreciate it. Thank you for, for spending time with
us. Um, and like I said, if if you need a family
medicine doctor or, or a primary care physician,
um, you can find, uh, doctor railings information
or any of our family med, primary care doctors, information
and profiles, locations, hours on our website, on white cal
thought you’d be, you. So I’m encouraged. Are you going to check that
out and get more information? I hope you all have a great day
and we’ll see you next time. Thanks for listening to this episode of
the best health podcast brought to you by wake forest baptist health.
For more wellness info. Check out wake help.edu and
follow us on social media. Wake Forest Baptist health, the
gold standard of health care.

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